When To Use “Looking Forward To Hearing From You”

If you “look forward to something”, you are eager or excited for it to happen in the future. “Looking forward to hearing from” or “look forward to hearing from you” are two common phrases that you often see at the end of a letter. These phrases have the same meaning; there is no doubt about that. However, it is more complicated when you consider their usage.

At The Movies – How To Use The Phrase Correctly

There are a lot of things for us to discuss about the phrase “at the movies”. Can we use both at the movies and in the movies? Why don’t we use “at the movie” instead of “at the movies”? What are the differences between “at the movies” and “in the theater?

If you also have these same questions, this small article is for you. Scroll down for these interesting grammar points.

What Does O’clock Stand For?

What does O’clock stand for? Do you want to know it? Well, just spend some minutes reading this article, you will not only find out what o’clock but also get the useful and common ways to ask for and tell the time in English.

Introduction

“O’clock” is a very common English word that it’s used very widely in everyday speech, especially when we talk about the time. But have you ever wanted to know what the word o’clock really stands for? Well, if you are looking for full version of this word, our today’s article can help.

Not only does let you know what o’clock stands for, this post also introduces you some useful and common ways to ask for and tell the Time in English. That’s enough for the introduction, now it’s the time for us to start exploring this writing. Here we go!

What does o’clock stand for?

As you can see, the word o’clock includes 2 parts: O’ + CLOCK. While “clock” is the device for measuring time, what O’ of o’clock means? In fact, O’ is a shortened way to say the word “of.” Combining these 2 parts, we know that o’clock stand for the phrase “of the clock,” right?

So when someone says “it’s 8 o’clock,” it means “it is 8 of the clock” – an old way to tell the time.

How to ask for and tell the Time in English?

Due to the fact that our today’s topic is related to clock and time, we decided to spend a part of this writing to remind you of some useful expressions and common ways used to ask and tell the time in the English language.

How to ask for the time?

Well, when you want to ask for time from the people around, you can use one of these common questions, including:

  • The questions to ask for the time right now.

- Excuse me, what time is it?

- Excuse me, what’s the time?

- Could you tell me the time, please? - A polite way to ask for the time.

  • The questions to ask for the time of a specific event.

You can use the question word of “what time” or “when” to make this type of question.

What time + auxiliary verb + S + V?

OR

When + auxiliary verb + S + V?

For example:

What time/When does the shop open?

What time/When does the show start?

What time/When should we meet?

Note: You are likely to get a general answer (like on Monday, on May, next week, …) if you use “when” instead of question word “what time.”

How to tell the time?

​Here are the 2 common ways you can use to tell the time.

​• Hour + Minutes -> Tell the hour first, then the minute

05:05 -It’s five oh five.

09:28 -It’s nine twenty-eight.

01:53 -It’s one fifty-three.

​• Minutes + Past/To + Hour -> Say the minutes first, then bring the hour

​For minutes from 1 to 30, you use PAST after the minutes.

For minutes from 31 to 59, you use TO after the minutes.

02:40 - It's twenty to three.

11:25 - It's twenty-five past eleven.

03:59 - It's one to three.

Important notes:

​1. We just use o'clock when there’re NO minutes. For example: 10:00 = ten o’clock, 9:00 = nine o’clock.

2. Say (a) quarter past… when it’s 15 minutes past the hour. For example: 8:15 = a quarter past eight.

3. Say a quarter to … when it’s 15 minutes before the hour. For example: 9:45 = a quarter to ten.

4. Say half past … when it’s 30 minutes past the hour. For example: 6:30 = half past six (three-thirty also.)

5. Say time + a.m./p.m. OR time + in the morning/afternoon/evening if you want your answer to be more specific.

For example:

- 5:00 (in the morning) = 5 a.m. = 5 o’clock in the morning = five in the morning

- 3:00 (in the afternoon) = 3 p.m. = 3 o’clock in the afternoon = three in the afternoon

- 24:00= Midnight = 12 a.m. = 12 o’clock at night

Some last words

Well, now you are clear about o’clock meaning and the question “What does o’clock stand for?” is completely solved, right? It’s exactly the short form of the phrase “of the clock.” In addition, we also reminded you of common ways of how to ask for and tell the time in English in this post. Hope that they are all useful to you!

Thanks you for reading this post! Don’t forget to like and share our today’s writing if you find it interesting!

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What Does “Lying Around” Mean?

Lying around – What is the meaning of this phrasal verb? Is it used commonly in English? What about its usage? How should we use it in a sentence? … Stay here and we’ll together learn about phrasal verb “lying around” right now!

Introduction

Phrasal verbs are used very, very commonly in everyday situations and conversations between native speakers. Well, as the learner of English, one of the things you should do is to remember as many phrasal verbs as possible if you want to be fluent in English, especially spoken English.

Well, when it comes English phrasal verbs, in the today’s article, we really want to introduce you a quite common one that you might find it useful and interesting after understanding its meaning. It’s “lying around”!

So, what does “lying around” mean? How to use it in a sentence? Everything about this phrasal verb will be revealed to you right here and right now. Also, we are going to list out other phrasal verbs with the main verb of lie or lying. Well, let’s do it right now!

What does “lying around” mean?

Lying around is the V-ing form of phrasal verb “lie around”. Well, first to say the verb “lie” in this case doesn’t mean to say something that is not true, it means to be in a reclined position. And according to Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary (at oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com), lie around (or lying around as the V-ing form)features 2 different meanings, as follows:

- If something is lying around, it isleft somewhere in an untidy or careless way, instead of putting away in the correct place.

For example: This man always has a lot of clothes lying around.

- If someone is lying around, it means this person is spending time doing nothing and being lazy.

For example: Clara spent her whole day just lying around.

Well, we bet that the meanings of this phrasal verb are quite simple and easy for you to understand and remember, right? Let’s move on to the next part of this post to dig deeper into the usage of Lie around!

“Lying around” usage

Due to the meanings of lying around that is made clear above, we can use this phrasal verb to describe the fact that something is left in a disordered way or someone spends some time lazily in a place. Now, let’s take a look at the examples below here to see how “lie around” is used in a sentence.

- When I was a child, my grandmother always told me not to leave toys lying around.

- My friends and I lie around in the house all day just playing games.

- John was lying around by the pool.

- Never leave your cash lying around in the house.

- Go out and get some exercises instead of lying around all day long.

- I always try to put my cooking stuffs in the correct place instead of leaving them lying around.

- She did all the household chores while he just lay around.

Other phrasal verbs with Lie

Together with lie around, there are other common English phrasal verbs that also have “lie” as the main verb, including:

- Lie about (= lie around) -> This phrasal verb is Lie around synonym

- Lie down (= rest, recline)

- Lie down on (= rest, recline on something such as lie down on a bed, a couch)

- Lie with (= be decided by)

These 4 phrasal verbs are all useful to you, aren’t they? If you haven’t known these words before and now you find them interesting and worth remembering, you should note them somewhere to learn. By that way, we believe that you can enrich your English vocabulary in a quick and effective way.

Wrap up

Recently, we introduced you 5 phrasal verbs that come with the main verb “lie,” including lie around, lie about, lie down, lie down on, and lie with. Do you agree with us that they are all useful words to learn? If you find them helpful, make sure that you remember and understand the meanings and usage of these words, especially the verb lie around.

We all know that there are tons of phrasal verbs in English and learning them is never an easy task for a lot of learners of English. However, knowing more and more phrasal verbs helps you become confident in communicating with English native speakers, so try to remember as many as you can. Well, with the today’s article about the meaning of lying around, we really hope we did bring you good knowledge of English with useful and interesting phrasal verbs. Thanks you for spending time reading this post!

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How’ve – How’re And Other Common Contractions In English

Contractions in English, what are they? Are they used widely in both spoken and written English? How and when to use them in the sentence? Keep reading on to find the answer to all of these questions yourself.

Introduction

Have you ever noticed the fact that people oftenhave the words like how’ve, how’re, how’d or something like these? What do they mean? How should we use them when making a sentence? And are these words are all acceptable in the English language?

Well, right now we would like to let you know that all of the words like how’ve, how’re, there’s, there’re, and so on, are called the contractions in English. There’s nothing wrong if you use them in the right way. In fact, the native speakersuse contractionsvery commonly in every speech and informal writings.

What more about contractions do you want to know? Let’s be here with us until the end of in this writing, we will together learn everything about the contractions in English, from the common ones to use, their meaning and usage. But now, we should figure out what contraction really is before going into any further details. Are you ready? Let’s do it right now!

What is a contraction?

A contraction is a word or a phrase that is shortened by dropping one or more letters. In written English, an apostrophe (‘) takes the place of the missing letter(s.)

For example:

I’m = I am-> I’m a teacher. = I am a teacher.

Hasn’t = has not ->He hasn’t been here. = He has not been here.

Like we mentioned before, native speakers usually use contractions in spoken English. Contracted words are also often used in informal pieces of writing like text messages, memos, or blogs. However, contractions are usually considered inappropriate in formal writings such as business letters, academic reports, essays, etc.

So, always keep in your mind that if you have to write formal forms of writing, do not use contractions. Using contracted forms may make your formal writings look unprofessional.

How’ve and How’re meaning

How’ve and how’re are common contractions in everyday language. When “how’ve” stands for “how have,”“how’re” is the contracted form of “how are.” Now, let’s take alook at the short conversation below between Tim and Dave to see how these 2 contractions are used.

Dave: Hey, Tim. How’re you doing? (= How are you doing?)

Tim: Hi, Dave. Long time no see. I’m very fine.

Well, how’ve you been? (= How have you been?)

Dave: Thanks Tim. Everything have been well with me.

List of common contractions in the English Language

Along with I’m, hasn’t, how’re, and how’ve, there are so many other common contractions people often use in English. Here’s the table of common contractions in the English Language that you should know.

Types of contractions Contractions (Contracted forms) Full forms Examples
Contractions with I I’m, I’ve, I’ll I am, I have, I will I’m here.
I’d I would OR I had I’d (I had)finished the dinner before he came. I’d (I would) like to go again.
Contractions with YOU, WE, THEY You’re, We’re, They’re You/we/they are You’re my best friend.
You’ve, We’ve, They’ve You/we/they have We’ve thought about your request.
You’ll, We’ll, They’ll You/we/they will They’ll visit us next month.
You’d, We’d, They’d You/we/they would OR You/we/they had She’d (she would) rather go shopping. He’d (had) gone to bed before I called.
Contractions with HE, SHE, IT He’s, She’s, It’s He/she/it is OR He/she/it has He’s good at playing football. He’s learned French for 2 years.
He’ll, She’ll, It’ll He/she/it will She’ll (= she will) be working late today.
He’d, She’d, It’d He/she/it would OR He/she/ it had He’d (had) better do the homework. She’d (would) have really liked it.
Contractions with THERE, THAT There’s That’s There is, There has That is, That has There’s (there is) a cake on the table. That’s the reason why he leaves.
There’ll, That’ll There will, That will There’ll be a music festival soon.
There’d, That’d There would, That would OR There had, That had There’d (there would) been more people here if our party had been on Saturday. That’d (that would) be great. That’d (that had) been why.
There’re There are There’re 4 people in the room.
Negative Contractions (-n’t ending) aren't, isn’t, don’t, didn’t, doesn’t, can't, hasn't, haven’t, mustn't, won't, shouldn’t, wasn’t, etc are not; is not; do not; did not; does not; cannot; has not; have not; must not; will not; should not; was not;etc We aren’t invited to the party. He doesn’t like this cake. We won’t make this happen. You shouldn’t eat too much sugar. He didn’t remember me. ……

Wrap up

Now, we finally get to the end of this writing. After all, do you completely understand what a contraction is, how and when to use contracted forms in English? That’s all really simple and easy to remember to you, right?

For some last words, we hope that this post did provide you with helpful and practical knowledge of English. Well, there’re still many other great writings about English grammar and word meaning waiting for you to explore on our site at wordtaking.com. So, feel free to browse around the site to get to the topics that you concern. Thanks you for reading this post!

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Word Of The Day: DIY Meaning And Usage

What is the meaning of DIY? How to use DIY in a sentence? What about DIYer? Let’s find out what DIY and DIYer exactly stand for and how to use these terms in our today’s article.

Introduction

If you are the person who has the daily habit of surfing or browsing the web and social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter, and especially Youtube, the acronym DIY must look really, really familiar to you, right?In fact, the term DIY is used very, very widely in the English language today.

But what is the exact meaning of DIY? What does DIY stand for? How is this acronym used in the sentence? Have ever these questions come to your mind when you heard or saw the acronym DIY somewhere on the Internet?

Well, if that’s the case, it is right time for us to learn about DIY meaning in English and its usage as well. Let’s come with us and we will together figure out everything related to this term. Here we go!

DIY meaning

Before discussing the meaning of DIY, we need to know what it really stands for, right? DIY is the abbreviated form of the word Do-It-Yourself. Remember that the full version of this term is always hyphenated. It’s Do-It-Yourself, not Do It Yourself.

About DIY (Do-It-Yourself) meaning, according to en.oxforddictionaries.com, this term is defined as the activity of building,decorating, and making repairs at home by oneself instead ofemploying a professional.

Along with DIY, people nowadays also use the termDIYer(s) very commonly. Because DIY stands for Do-It-Yourself, DIYermeans Do-It-Yourselfer(s) that refer to the person who likes to do or practice DIY things. For example, He is a true DIYer since he can do almost everything for the house himself.

Now, you are clear about the meaning of DIY, let’s move on to learn about the usage of this term in the next part of this writing.

How to use DIY in a sentence

This acronym can be used as a noun or an adjective. Let’s take a look at the examples below here to see how this term is used in the sentences. Notice when it plays the role of a noun and when it’s an adjective.

1. The owners of this house are really keen on DIY and they have made a lot of changes.

2. There are a lot of DIY videos on Youtube.

3. He wants to make a DIY table.

4. DIY helps you save a lot of money.

5. Women are always interested DIY projects for many different reasons.6. DIY may require the beginners a lot of time and effort.

Wrap up

That’s everything about DIY meaning we want to introduce in the today’s article. After all, we need to remember that DIY stands for do-it-yourself andDIYer(s) is the abbreviated form of do-it-yourselfer(s). While DIYer is used as a noun, the term DIY can be used as either a noun or an adjective.

Since DIY is a very common term in English, it’s quite necessary for us to understand the meaning and usage of this word, so that we can always use it properly and correctly in the sentence. In the end, we really hope that this writing brought you useful knowledge of English. Thanks you for reading our today’s post!

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